eLetters

88 e-Letters

published between 2002 and 2005

  • Antibiotic resistance and hospital clinicians
    Subhash C. Arya

    Dear Editor,

    Barlow and Nathwani[1] reviewed medico legal and allied aspects of restraints encountered by clinicians in teaching hospital based units in recommending intravenous and broad-spectrum antibiotics. While the local epidemiological resistance patterns would be an asset, clinicians would desire for a rapid response from the local clinical microbiologist. Recently marketed automated devices might not be perfect...

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  • Re: Region specific and age dependent Amyloid beta clearance by degrading enzymes
    Jos Tournoy

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr. Singh for his interest in our review. Excellent reviews are available that focus exclusively on the role of amyloid degrading enzymes in aging and neurodegeneration and we would like to refer the interested readers to these reviews (Turner, Fisk et al. 2004; Hama and Saido 2005).

    Iwata (Iwata, Takaki et al. 2002) demonstrated a statistically significant decrease of NE in the hi...

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  • Reactivation of old scars: Inevitably sarcoid
    Sevtap Sipahi Demirkok

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest Sorabjee and Garje’s recent article on reactivation of old scars[1] I feel that some points must be clarified.

    Sorabjee and Garje state that histopathological demonstration of non-caseating granulomas on scar tissue obtained by biopsy in a patient presented with multiple mediastinal lymph nodes accompanied with numerious old scars is sufficient for diagnosis of sarcoidosi...

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  • Region specific and age dependent Amyloid beta clearance by degrading enzymes
    Prabhakar Singh

    Dear Editor,

    Article by Vandenberghe R and Tournoy J. entitled “Cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease” tells a story of Alzheimer’s disease and its cognitive relation with aging. As reported in this review that there is age related changes in the amyloid degrading enzymes, IDE and Neprilysin, differs between regions and no clear picture has been emerged.

    But researchers from RIKEN brain Institute demons...

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  • Clozapine, agranulocytosis, and benign ethnic neutropenia
    David Esposito

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the editorial by Dr Rajagopal concerning the clinical implications of ethnic benign neutropenia in patients receiving clozapine treatment.[1)

    It is noteworthy that clozapine itself may induce transient and harmless neutropenia, and that such phenomenon are not restricted to certain ethnic groups. Transient neutropenia (defined as a return of the neutrophil count t...

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  • Crossed aphasia and crossed nonaphasia explained
    Iraj Derakhshan

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the recent report by Menon and colleagues in the Journal.[1] The explanations regarding the anatomy underpinning occurrences of crossed aphasia, i.e. transcallosal diaschisis (p. 342), does not hold since no such events occur in the vast majority of behavioral right-handers who sustained similar injuries to the temporoparietal lobe of the minor hemisphere as because there is no mot...

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  • Benign neurotropenia during clozapine treatment
    David Esposito

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the editorial by Dr Rajagopal concerning the clinical implications of ethnic benign neutropenia in patients receiving clozapine treatment.[1]

    It is noteworthy that clozapine itself may induce transient and harmless neutropenia, and that such phenomenon are not restricted to certain ethnic groups. Transient neutropenia (defined as a return of the neutrophil count...

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  • A micro-chip for CD4 cell count
    Sujoy Khan

    Dear Editor,

    Stebbing J et al.[1] article raises an important issue of the limited availability of CD4 measurements in resource-scarce settings which poses a major problem in the management of HIV infection. High cost of the perishable reagents, technically complicated and expensive flow cytometers remain a hurdle in developing countries where several million people are in need of therapy. Fortunately, advances in mi...

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  • Relying on proton pump inhibitor can advesly affect the prognosis of ischemic heart disease
    Alok Kumar Singh

    Dear Editor,

    I have read Heatley et al.’s article but I have certain queries in my mind. Heatley et al. are recommending the trial of four week therapy of proton pump inhibitor to exclude the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. I highly disagree to the fact that, as we know many of the myocardial infarction episodes, especially in elderly and diabetics, may present silently. Moreover, it is well known that with i...

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  • Triangle of safety
    James R Griffiths

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr Creagh-Brown for his interest in our article and comments.

    We agree with the comments about figure 2, which is maybe misleading. The marks made by the juniors were judged with regard to the BTS guidelines as described in the article. Figure 2 is designed to illustrate where marks were made in relation to the triangle of safety (represented by the centre square). We agree that fig...

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