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Inpatient cardiovascular outcomes in patients with cancer affected by viral influenza infection
  1. Aakash R Sheth1,
  2. Udhayvir Singh Grewal2,
  3. Harsh P Patel3,
  4. Sahith Reddy Thotamgari1,
  5. Smit Patel4,
  6. Rohan Desai5,
  7. Samarthkumar Thakkar6,
  8. Aristotelis Papayannis7
  1. 1Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
  2. 2Department of Internal Medicine, LSU Health Shreveport, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
  3. 3Department of Internal Medicine, Louis A Weiss Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  4. 4Department of Internal Medicine, Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA
  5. 5Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas, USA
  6. 6Department of Internal Medicine, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA
  7. 7Department of Cardiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Aakash R Sheth, Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, USA; dr.arsheth{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background Influenza disproportionately affects individuals with underlying comorbidities. Long-term follow-up studies have shown that patients with cancer with influenza have higher mortality. However, very little is known about the in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular outcomes of influenza infection in cancer hospitalisations.

Methods We compared the in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with cancer with and without influenza by screening the National Inpatient Sample from 2015 to 2017. A total of 9 443 421 hospitalisations with any cancer were identified, out of which 14 634 had influenza while 9 252 007 did not. A two-level hierarchical multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, race, hospital type and relevant comorbidities was performed.

Results The group with cancer and influenza had higher in-hospital mortality (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.003 to 1.16; p=0.04), acute coronary syndromes (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.57 to 1.93; p<0.0001), atrial fibrillation (OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.29; p<0.0001) and acute heart failure (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.32 to 1.51; p<0.0001).

Conclusion Patients with cancer affected by influenza have higher in-hospital mortality and a higher prevalence of acute coronary syndrome, atrial fibrillation and acute heart failure.

  • adult cardiology
  • myocardial infarction
  • public health
  • cardiology
  • adult oncology

Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as online supplemental information. Not applicable.

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Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as online supplemental information. Not applicable.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors ARS, USSG, HPP, SRT and SP conceived and designed the study, wrote and reviewed the manuscript, and performed the statistical analysis. RD, ST and AP wrote and reviewed the manuscript. ARS is the guarantor.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.