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Using progression in adapted diabetes complications severity index score to predict erectile dysfunction in men affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus
  1. Wei Syun Hu1,2,
  2. Cheng Li Lin1
  1. 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
  2. 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Wei Syun Hu, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; weisyunhu{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objective This study is on the use of the adapted Diabetes Complications Severity Index (aDCSI) for erectile dysfunction (ED) risk stratification in male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM).

Methods This is a retrospective study with records obtained from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Adjusted HRs (aHRs) were estimated by multivariate Cox proportional hazards models with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results A population of 84 288 eligible male patients with type 2 DM were included. Compared with change in aDCSI score of 0.0–0.5 per year, the aHRs and the corresponding 95% CIs for other changes in aDCSI scores are summarised as follows: 1.10 (0.90 to 1.34) for change in aDCSI score of 0.5–1.0 per year; 4.44 (3.47 to 5.69) for change in aDCSI score of 1.0–2.0 per year; and 10.9 (7.47 to 15.9) for change in aDCSI score of >2.0 per year.

Conclusions Progression in aDCSI score might be used for ED risk stratification in men affected by type 2 DM.

  • adult intensive & critical care

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors contributed to the manuscript. All were involved in the design of the study, collection of data, statistical analysis and writing the manuscript. All authors were involved in the final approval of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was supported in part by the Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare Clinical Trial Center (MOHW109-TDU-B-212-114004), China Medical University (CMU110-AWARD-01) and China Medical University Hospital (DMR-HHC-110-4).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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