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Development and implementation of a postgraduate medical education-wide initiative in quality improvement and patient safety
  1. David Bowes1,2,
  2. Cindy Shearer1,
  3. Trisha Daigle-Maloney3,
  4. John Dornan4,
  5. Andrew Lynk5,
  6. Jennie Parker6,
  7. Rodrigo LP Romao7,
  8. Sarah Stevens8,
  9. Stefan Allen2,
  10. Andrew Warren1,5,
  11. Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz9
  1. 1Postgraduate Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  2. 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  3. 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
  4. 4Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
  5. 5Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  6. 6Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  7. 7Departments of Surgery and Urology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  8. 8Department of Anaesthesia, Pain Management & Perioperative Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  9. 9Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr David Bowes, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; david.bowes{at}dal.ca

Abstract

Background Quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) have been assigned a higher profile in CanMEDS 2015, CanMEDS–Family Medicine 2017 and new accreditation standards, prompting an initiative at Dalhousie University to create a vision for integrating QIPS into postgraduate medical education.

Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of a QIPS strategy across residency education at Dalhousie University.

Methods A QIPS task force was formed, and a literature review and needs assessment survey were completed. A needs assessment survey was distributed to all Dalhousie residency programme directors. 12 programme directors were interviewed individually to collect additional feedback. The results were used to develop a ‘road map’ of recommendations with a graduated timeline.

Results A task force report was released in February 2018. 46 recommendations were developed with a timeframe and responsible party identified for each. Implementation of the QIPS strategy is underway, and evaluation and challenges faced will be described.

Conclusions We have developed a multiyear strategy that is available to provide guidance and support to all programmes in QIPS. The development and implementation of this QIPS framework may serve as a template for other institutions who seek to integrate these competencies into residency training.

  • quality in health care
  • medical education & training
  • health & safety
  • education & training (see medical education & training)

Data availability statement

There are no data in this work

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Footnotes

  • Presented at Oral presentation at the International Conference for Residency Education, November 2020.

  • Contributors DB is responsible as guarantor for the overall content of this study. The work described in this paper was done by a task force and standing committee composed of the authorship group. SA-S (now retired) was the chair of the QIPS task force and planned the work described here with ultimate approval by AW. DB is the chair of the QIPS standing committee, wrote the first draft of this article and submitted this work for publication. CS completed the needs assessment survey and evaluation report described. All authors contributed to the development of the recommendations and subsequent steps taken to implement the recommendations and contributed to the drafting and approval of the manuscript. This work was supported and sponsored by AW, the associate dean of Postgraduate Medical Education.

  • Funding This work was supported and sponsored by AW, the associate dean of Postgraduate Medical Education. This study was not funded.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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