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Strategies for promoting the well-being of postgraduate medical trainees
  1. Kartik Kumar1,2,
  2. Angus G Royal3
  1. 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK
  3. 3Department of Anaesthesia, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kartik Kumar, Department of Respiratory Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London W2 1NY, UK; kartik.kumar{at}nhs.net

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We read with interest the article by Taylor et al1 about the positive impact of their interventions for managing stress among junior doctors. Trainee burnout is a significant issue that is associated with an adverse impact on clinicians’ health and risks compromising patient safety due to medical errors.2 Furthermore, from a healthcare organisation perspective, burnout poses logistical challenges due to staff absenteeism. In its report ‘Caring for doctors, caring for patients’, the UK General Medical Council (GMC) states that doctors’ well-being is ‘vital because there is abundant evidence that workplace stress in healthcare organisations affects quality of care for patients as well as doctors’ own health’.3 To successfully support trainees, it is important to recognise that they are a heterogeneous group of individuals for whom a variety of strategies may need to be considered to meet their diverse needs and preferences.

There is a desire among trainees to …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors KK and AGR drafted the initial manuscript and critically revised the manuscript for content.

  • Funding KK is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). KK is also supported by the Lee Family endowment to the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London. The funders had no role in the preparation or submission of this manuscript.

  • Disclaimer The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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