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Analysis of driving simulator performance for post-call orthopaedic surgery residents
  1. Louis C Grandizio,
  2. Daniela F Barreto Rocha,
  3. J Alexander Holbert,
  4. Elizabeth J Pavis,
  5. David Hopkins,
  6. Kathryn Volarich,
  7. Joel C Klena
  1. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Louis C Grandizio, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA 17822, USA; chris.grandizio{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Purpose Despite the associations between workhours, fatigue and motor vehicle accidents, driving abilities for residents post-call have been infrequently analysed. Our purpose was to compare orthopaedic surgery resident performance on a driving simulator after a night of call compared with their baseline.

Study design All residents from a single orthopaedic programme were asked to complete baseline and post-call driving simulator assessments and surveys. The primary outcome measure was brake reaction time (BRT) and secondary outcome measures included lane variance, speed variance and accidents on the driving simulator.

Results All 19 orthopaedic residents agreed to participate. Compared with the baseline assessment, residents demonstrated significantly higher levels of sleepiness on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale post-call (1.6 vs 3.4; p<0.0001). Despite higher levels of fatigue post-call, there was no statistically significant differences between baseline and post-call assessments for mean BRT, accidents, lane variation and speed variation.

Conclusions These data suggest that for orthopaedic residents, driving simulator performance does not appear to be worse after a single night of call compared with baseline. Future collaborative, multicentre investigations on post-call driving safety that incorporate different call types and frequencies are necessary to better define the impact of post-call fatigue on driving performance. Recognising that motor vehicle accidents remain the leading cause of death for people under the age of 30 years, these continued areas of study are necessary to truly establish a culture of resident safety.

  • orthopaedic & trauma surgery
  • adult orthopaedics
  • education & training (see medical education & training)
  • ethics (see medical ethics)

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Deidentified data may be made available upon request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Deidentified data may be made available upon request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors LG planned the study, assisted with statistics, wrote and edited the manuscript and was responsible for the overall content as a guarantor. DBR planned the study, collected data, assisted with manuscript writing, performed statistics and edited the manuscript. JAH coordinated the study, collected data, assisted with manuscript writing and edited the manuscript. EP planned the study, collected data, assisted with manuscript writing and edited the manuscript. DH coordinated the study, collected data, assisted with manuscript writing and edited the manuscript. KV coordinated the study, collected data, assisted with manuscript writing and edited the manuscript. JK planned the study, wrote and edited the manuscript, and was responsible for the overall content as a guarantor.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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