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Cosmetic surgeries and procedures among youth in Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study of undergraduate university students in the Eastern Province
  1. Nouf A AlShamlan1,
  2. Reem S AlOmar1,
  3. Abdullah Zuhair Al-Sahow2,
  4. Abeer A AlShamlan2,
  5. Bayan Mohammed Almir2,
  6. Wejdan M Al-johani1,
  7. Abdullatif K Althunyan1,
  8. Sameerah Motabgani1
  1. 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
  2. 2College of Medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nouf A AlShamlan, Department of Family and Community medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; nashamlan{at}iau.edu.sa

Abstract

Purpose of the study To assess the attitudes and acceptance of cosmetic surgeries and procedures among undergraduate university students in the Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia, as well as the barriers against having cosmetic surgeries and procedures.

Study design A cross-sectional study of undergraduate university students in the Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia, during October 2020. The research instrument included the Attitudes towards Cosmetic Surgery Scale (ACSS), sociodemographic data and perceived barriers towards cosmetic surgeries and procedures. A bivariate analysis was performed followed by a linear regression to account for confounders.

Results A total of 1240 students participated in the study. The mean ACSS for cosmetic surgeries was 3.14 (±1.37 SD), and 3.25 (±1.49 SD) for cosmetic procedures. Older students, students with a history of previous cosmetic surgeries/procedures, and students with engineering specialties had more acceptance scores in both cosmetic surgeries and procedures. On the other hand, men, students belonging to a middle family income and students who perceived themselves to be aware of the risk associated with cosmetic surgeries/procedures had less acceptance scores. The most reported barrier to have cosmetic surgeries and procedures among students was feeling that they do not need it.

Conclusion The findings from the current study could help dermatologists, plastic surgeons and adolescent specialists wishing to recognise the rising interest in cosmetic surgeries and procedures in Arabic youth populations, the possible associated factors, as well as the barriers to have these surgeries and procedures. A further qualitative in-depth study to explore the acceptance is suggested.

  • surgical dermatology
  • dermatological epidemiology
  • adult dermatology
  • plastic & reconstructive surgery

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @nashamlan

  • Contributors Conceptualisation: NAS and AAS. Data analysis: NAS and RSO. Methodology: NAS, RSO, AAS and AKA. Writing-review and editing: all authors. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) committee at Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University. The anonymity and confidentially of the participants’ data were maintained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available upon reasonable request. The datasets used and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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