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Malignant epistaxis: a case wandering prostate cancer metastasis
  1. Dinesh Keerty1,
  2. Kevin C Eaton1,
  3. Karina Trejo1,
  4. Carolina Strosberg2,
  5. Elizabeth J Haynes1
  1. 1Internal Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USA
  2. 2Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dinesh Keerty, Internal Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; dinesh.keerty{at}gmail.com

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Introduction

The most common causes of epistaxis are trauma, foreign bodies and infections. Nasopharyngeal tumours are known to cause epistaxis. Metastatic spread from prostate cancer to the nose and paranasal sinuses is uncommon as it normally spreads to bone, lymph nodes and liver.1

Case report

A male patient in his late 70s with metastatic prostate cancer presented with recurrent episodes of epistaxis. He was diagnosed with a left nasal polyp which required polypectomy. Despite removal of the polyp, the patient continued to experience epistaxis with progressive fatigue prompting multiple emergent evaluations.

On presentation routine labs revealed the patient to be recurrently anaemic with haemoglobin level of 62 g/L, PSA …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors DK: provided the design of the work, analysis of data, drafting the work for important intellectual content, and had final approval of the version published. I am accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. KCE: provided contributions to the acquisition, analysis of data, drafting the work and had final approval of the version published. KT: provided contributions to the acquisition, analysis of data, drafting the work and had final approval of the version published. CS: provided contributions to the acquisition, analysis of data, drafting the work and had final approval of the version published. EJH: provided the design of the work, analysis of data, drafting the work for important intellectual content and had final approval of the version published.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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