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Atypical neurological manifestations of dengue fever: a case series and mini review
  1. Nandita Prabhat1,
  2. Sucharita Ray1,
  3. Kamalesh Chakravarty1,
  4. Heena Kathuria1,
  5. Sukriya Saravana1,
  6. Deependra Singh1,
  7. Alex Rebello1,
  8. Vikas Lakhanpal1,
  9. Manoj Kumar Goyal1,
  10. Vivek Lal1
  1. Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  1. Correspondence to Sucharita Ray, Department of Neurology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India; sucharita.pgi{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background In this mini review, we discuss some of the atypical neurological manifestations of dengue virus and attempt to bring them to attention to highlight the neurotropic property of the dengue virus.

Methods Cases were chosen from retrospective hospital and outpatient records of all patients seropositive for dengue who attended the neurology referral. Seven patients have been chosen as illustrative examples of dengue-associated neurological involvement. We discuss the various central and peripheral nervous system involvement of patients and discuss the relevant findings in them.

Conclusion Through this case series, we wish to highlight that the dengue virus can affect the nervous system at various targets, using multiple mechanisms of pathogenesis to generate a plethora of presentations. Hence, it is vital to be aware of its presentations to be able to diagnose dengue and treat it accordingly.

  • Neurology
  • Adult neurology
  • Dementia
  • Migraine
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Motor neurone disease
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Footnotes

  • Contributors Writing manuscript: NP. Writing review and corresponding author: SR. Drafting of manuscript: KC. Editing of paper: VL. Editing of manuscript: MKG. Clinical cases seen: NP, HK, AR, VL, SS, DS.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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