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Propranolol-induced acneiform eruptions: revisiting a rare cutaneous side effect
  1. Pallavi Priyam1,
  2. Abheek Sil2,
  3. Dibyendu B Bhanja2,
  4. Dilip K Mondol1
  1. 1Department of Psychiatry, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India
  2. 2Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Abheek Sil, Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata 700004, India; abheek.sil{at}gmail.com

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Propranolol is a frequently prescribed non-selective beta-blocker for the management of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, post myocardial infarction, thyrotoxicosis, tremors and migraine prophylaxis.1 Although rare, it may produce dermatological side effects like exacerbation of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, alopecia and lupus erythematosus reactions.2 Here we describe a case of propranolol-induced acneiform eruption in a patient with no prior history of cutaneous problems.

A 28-year-old man presented with complaints of being worrisome, pounding of heart, trembling of hands, frequent excessive sweating, inability to relax and trouble falling asleep for the last 8–10 months. He had not received any prior treatment for these symptoms and all his routine investigations were normal. After normal cardiology and endocrine consultation, he was diagnosed as a case of a generalised anxiety disorder as per InternationalClassification of Diseases, Tenth Revision and …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors PP and AS: contributed to conception, initial drafting of manuscript, critical revision of content and final approval of manuscript. DBB and DKM: contributed to conception, critical revision of content and final approval of manuscript. All authors are in agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Ethics approval All the authors consented to publish this manuscript.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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