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Rifampicin-induced lichenoid drug eruption
  1. Dibyendu Bikash Bhanja1,
  2. Abheek Sil2,
  3. Avik Panigrahi3,
  4. Sayantani Chakraborty1
  1. 1Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
  2. 2Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
  3. 3Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dibyendu Bikash Bhanja, Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India; dibyendubhanja0901{at}gmail.com

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Rifampicin is a bactericidal drug extensively used for tuberculosis and leprosy. Common adverse drug reactions of rifampicin are hepatotoxicity, flu-like syndrome, gastrointestinal symptoms and thrombocytopenia; cutaneous adverse reaction encountered in only ∼1.23% of cases.1

A 45-year-old man, recently diagnosed with sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis and started on continuation phase therapy with isoniazid and rifampicin (Cat 1) for preceding 1 month presented with 2-week history of acute onset, pruritic generalised skin eruptions. Physical examination revealed multiple, violaceous, discrete and coalescing papules and plaques distributed almost symmetrically over the scalp, face, trunk and extremities (figure 1A,B). Other mucocutaneous and systemic examination was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation was notable for peripheral eosinophilia (absolute eosinophil count 3.01 × 10ˆ9/L). Histopathological examination from lesion revealed hyperkeratosis with focal parakeratosis, basal cell degeneration with upper dermal band-like …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors DBB and AS contributed to initial patient assessment and follow-up, conception, drafting of manuscript and final approval of manuscript. AP and SC contributed to conception, critical revision of content and final approval of manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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