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Increased hip circumference in individuals with metabolic syndrome affects serum nesfatin-1 levels
  1. Tuba Tekin1,
  2. Betül Çiçek2,
  3. Nurefşan Konyalıgil2,
  4. İnayet Güntürk3,
  5. Cevat Yazıcı4,
  6. Züleyha Karaca5,
  7. Meltem Ünlüsavuran6
  1. 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey
  2. 2Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
  3. 3Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Niğde Üniversitesi, Niğde, Turkey
  4. 4Department of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
  5. 5Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
  6. 6Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
  1. Correspondence to Tuba Tekin, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nutrition and Dietetics, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas 058140, Turkey; tuba.tekin38{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background This case–control study was conducted to investigate the relationship between serum nesfatin-1 levels and nutritional status and blood parameters in patients diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

Methods Thirty patients (case) diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were included. Thirty healthy subjects (control) matched with patients with metabolic syndrome in terms of age, gender and body mass index were included. Three-day food consumption records were obtained. Anthropometric indices were measured and body composition was determined by bioelectrical impedance method. Biochemical parameters and serum nesfatin-1 levels were measured after 8 hours of fasting.

Results Serum nesfatin-1 levels were 0.245±0.272 ng/mL in the case group and 0.528±0.987 ng/mL in the control group (p>0.05). There was a positive significant correlation between serum nesfatin-1 levels and body weight, waist and hip circumferences in the case group (p<0.05). Each unit increase in hip circumference measurement affects the levels of nesfatin by 0.014 times. In the control group, there was a positive significant correlation between body weight and serum nesfatin-1 levels (p<0.05). A significant correlation was detected between HbA1c and serum nesfatin-1 levels in the case group (p<0.05). A significant relationship was detected between dietary fibre intake and the serum nesfatin-1 levels in the case group (p<0.05).

Conclusions Anthropometric indices and blood parameters were correlated with serum nesfatin-1 levels in patients with metabolic syndrome. More clinical trials may be performed to establish the relationship between serum nesfatin-1 levels and nutritional status.

  • anthropometricindices
  • hip circumference
  • metabolic syndrome
  • Nesfatin-1
  • nutrition
  • nutritional status
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Footnotes

  • Contributors TT, BÇ and NK have been involved in the planning, execution and writing of the study. TT and NK collected the data. CY and İG have worked with nesfatin-1 ELISA kit. ZK has identified patients with metabolic syndrome. MÜ made statistical analyses. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This study was supported by the Instructor Training Program.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement If the data are a reasonable request to be accessed, the responsible author can be contacted.

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