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Twelve commandments of radiology: guidance on the use of imaging in clinical practice
  1. Katherine Victoria Hurst1,
  2. Naomi Warner2,
  3. Mark Bratby3,
  4. Ashok Inderraj Handa1
  1. 1 Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford, UK
  2. 2 General Surgery, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK
  3. 3 Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
  1. Correspondence to Ashok Inderraj Handa, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK; ashok.handa{at}nds.ox.ac.uk

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Introduction

The requesting of radiological investigations is frequently devolved to the ward-based doctors in training. In a National Health Service system that is regularly over capacity, radiological investigations are an expensive commodity often overused or poorly targeted by doctors. By considering the following ‘Commandments of Radiology’; doctors could target imaging more appropriately, resulting in higher quality information and hence, better patent care and value for money.

Commandments

Thou shalt give an accurate history

Good quality information should be given to the radiologist to facilitate a good quality report. Ward-based clinicians have the benefit of reviewing the patient history, completing a full examination and understanding the clinical background. The radiologist benefits from this information to target their assessment and consequently their report.

Thou shalt put the patient first

When requesting …

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