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Mild cognitive impairment in primary care: a clinical review
  1. Georges Assaf,
  2. Maria Tanielian
  1. Department of Family Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon
  1. Correspondence to Dr Georges Assaf, Department of Family Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; ga62{at}aub.edu.lb

Abstract

Dementia is projected to become a global health priority but often not diagnosed in its earlier preclinical stage which is mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MCI is generally referred as a transition state between normal cognition and Alzheimer’s disease. Primary care physicians play an important role in its early diagnosis and identification of patients most likely to progress to Alzheimer’s disease while offering evidenced-based interventions that may reverse or halt the progression to further cognitive impairment. The aim of this review is to introduce the concept of MCI in primary care through a case-based clinical review. We discuss the case of a patient with MCI and provide an evidence-based framework for assessment, early recognition and management of MCI while addressing associated risk factors, neuropsychiatric symptoms and prognosis.

  • mild cognitive impairment
  • primary care
  • dementia
  • short-term memory loss

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GA: performed the literature review and initial manuscript writeup. MT: contributed to the literature review. Both authors critically reviewed and advised on each draft.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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