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A rare cause of shoulder pain
  1. Tom Jaconelli1,
  2. Sunil Auplish2
  1. 1 Department of Emergency Medicine, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, York, UK
  2. 2 Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, York, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Tom Jaconelli, Department of Emergency Medicine, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, York, YO31 8HE, UK; tomjaconelli{at}doctors.org.uk

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A 23-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 1-year history of atraumatic right shoulder pain. Over the preceding few months, the pain had worsened and her range of movement had reduced considerably. She was otherwise fit and healthy.

On examination, her shoulder appeared normal and there was no obvious neurovascular deficit, including the axillary nerve. She had no movement in any direction actively, but passively could bring her shoulder to 60° of abduction and forward flexion.

A plain radiograph of the …

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Footnotes

  • TJ and SA contributed equally.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.