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Continuing medical education during a pandemic: an academic institution’s experience
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  1. Abhiram Kanneganti1,
  2. Ching-Hui Sia2,3,
  3. Balakrishnan Ashokka4,5,
  4. Shirley Beng Suat Ooi6,7
  1. 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National University Hospital, Singapore
  2. 2 Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore
  3. 3 Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  4. 4 Department of Anaesthesia, National University Hospital, Singapore
  5. 5 Centre for Medical Education, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  6. 6 Emergency Medicine Department, National University Hospital, Singapore
  7. 7 Department of Surgery, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  1. Correspondence to Dr Abhiram Kanneganti, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National University Hospital, Singapore 119074, Singapore; abhiram_kanneganti{at}nuhs.edu.sg

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected healthcare systems worldwide. The disruption to hospital routines has affected continuing medical education (CME) for specialty trainees (STs). We share our academic institution's experience in mitigating the disruption on the CME programme amidst the pandemic. Most specialty training programmes had switched to videoconferencing to maintain teaching. Some programmes also utilized small group teachings with precautions and e-learning modules. Surgical residencies were disproportionately affected due to reductions in elective procedures but some ways to provide continued surgical exposure include going through archived surgical videos with technical pointers from experienced faculty and usage of surgical simulators . We should adapt CME sessions to keep trainees up to date with core clinical competencies as they will continue to manage both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 cases and this pandemic may last until year's end.

  • audit
  • telemedicine
  • education & training (see medical education & training)
  • health policy
  • medical education & training

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Footnotes

  • Contributors AK, C-HS and BA had equally contributed in conceiving and writing this paper. BA and SB-SO critically reviewed this manuscript. SB-SO is the Designated Institutional Official and oversees all specialty training programmes in the National University Health System, Singapore.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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