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Osteopoikilosis
  1. Shuzhong Liu1,
  2. Xi Zhou2,
  3. An Song3,
  4. Zhen Huo4,
  5. Yong Liu5,
  6. Yipeng Wang2
  1. 1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Beijing, China
  2. 2 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
  3. 3 Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
  4. 4 Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
  5. 5 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Dongcheng-qu, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Yipeng Wang, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China; ypwang_pumch{at}163.com

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A 39-year-old man presented to the orthopaedic clinic with a 1-month history of sacrococcygeal pain. The patient denied experiencing any other constitutional symptoms and any other disorders, and no history of trauma or surgery during the past years. Clinical examination and laboratory investigations revealed no definite abnormality. CT of the hip showed multiple calcification foci in the bilateral acetabulums and femoral heads (figure 1). Single-photon emission CT revealed no other abnormalities except multifocal high intake lesions involving the bilateral acetabulums and femoral heads. The patient was treated with palliative ‘wait and watch’ strategy and received close follow-up in an outpatient clinic.

Figure 1

Transverse CT scan of the hip showing multiple calcification foci in the bilateral acetabulums and femoral heads.

Osteopoikilosis or ‘spotted bone disease’ is a benign condition characterised by sclerotic bone lesions most commonly involving the hands, feet, pelvis and the ends of long bones.1 Most frequently, osteopoikilosis is observed after fractures or surgical procedures, while it is exceedingly rare and mostly occurs unilaterally.1 2 Osteopoikilosis is typically found incidentally on imaging studies done for unrelated complaints.1 2 Early recognition and accurate diagnosis are essential to prevent unnecessary emotional distress and invasive testing.3 No routine follow-up visit or studies are necessary for this rarity. The present case highlights the importance of accurate diagnosis and proper treatment for patients with osteopoikilosis.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SL wrote the first draft of the manuscript and submitted the manuscript. XZ, AS and ZH were in charge of the patient and collected the data. SL and YL did the follow-up of the patient, and YW and YL critically revised the manuscript. YW and YL contributed equally to this paper. All authors approved the final version.

  • Funding This study was funded by Peking Union Medical College Graduate Student Innovation Fund (grant no: project no 2018-1002-02-08) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001809) (grant no: project no 81871746).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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