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Effects of breathing exercises using home-based positive pressure in the expiratory phase in patients with COPD
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  • Published on:
    Breathe in, Hold on and breathe out, effective exercise for COPD
    • Giuseppe A. Marraro, Professor of Critical Care Medicine and Anesthesiology Second Aff. Hospital Quanzhou Medical University, China /First Aff. Hospital Wenzhou Medical University, China
    • Other Contributors:
      • Claudio Spada, Adj Prof. Second Aff. Hosp. Quanzhou Medical University, China

    Letter response to the article “Effects of breathing exercises using home-based positive pressure in the expiratory phase in patients with COPD

    Abstract
    Following the publication of the manuscript “Effects of breathing exercises using home-based positive pressure in the expiratory phase in patients with COPD” in Postgraduate Medical Journal written by Lin Q. et al., we describe the rationale and origin of the respiratory technique derived from yoga practice and adapted as breathing exercise for a pulmonary rehabilitation programme strategy for COPD patients. The discussed technique consist of breathing with an expiratory resistive load, is a modified Pranayama yogic breathing practices tailored with focus on the specific need of patient with COPD, that allow the patient to breathe simultaneously through both the nostrils and with exhalation to be completed against a resistance to the free flow of exhaled gases. The described method has also been proven very useful in reopening non-ventilating lung areas for both chronic and acute patients.
    I have read with great interest the manuscript “Effects of breathing exercises using home-based positive pressure in the expiratory phase in patients with COPD” published in Postgraduate Medical Journal written by Lin Q. and collaborators 1. As reported by the authors in the acknowledgment of the paper, I was instrumental to inspire the study while working with the Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and RICU in the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.