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The future of care for frail elderly patients: our first steps towards progress
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  • Published on:
    Holistic care needs to be met with holistic education

    The increasing numbers of frail elderly patients certainly poses a challenge for all parts of the healthcare landscape within the UK and beyond. Whilst organisational change and modifications to where, when and how we deliver care is important this must be underpinned by appropriate education for doctors and allied healthcare professionals.

    Much of this needs to be aimed at more junior staff, especially medical...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Less health care might be fair in the older patient.

    Predicting prognosis in this older group of patients is complex due to their highly variable health status, driven by their fundamentally different prognosis to younger patients. We have published two recent pieces on this theme, showing that firstly though there was an incremental reduction in the use of evidence-based therapies for ACS (acute coronary syndrome) with older age and that better survival was associated with...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.