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Raised cardiac troponin T levels in patients without acute coronary syndrome
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  • Published on:
    Reliability of cardiac markers and acute coronary syndrome
    • Kaushik Sanyal, Department of Medicine
    • Other Contributors:
      • K.Sabanathan

    Dear editor,

    Troponin T and Troponin I have highly sensitive and specific monoclonal antibodies, released as ternary (T-I-C) or binary (I-C) or free trop T. There is also a fractional cross-sectional reactivity with skeletal Trop T even though it is considered as a long term prognostic marker of morbidity which helps in the stratification of chest pain. Trop T rises due to myocardial involvement. Patients without...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Dear Editor
    • Peter SC Wong, Consultant Cardiologist & Physician
    • Other Contributors:
      • Anne Robinson, Research Nurse

    Dear Editor

    We agree with Dr Jolobe that symptoms of cardiac ischaemia should not be limited to chest pain alone. Our study inclusion criteria included all patients who had one or more troponin T blood tests, irrespective of their presenting symptoms and diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome or not. Our findings showed that chest pain was absent in 43% of patients with acute coronary syndrome and raised troponin...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    atypical presentations of acute coronary syndrome include left bundle barnch block and absence of ch

    Dear editor

    In the above study acute coronary syndrome(ACS) was defined as the presence of ischaemic cardiac symptoms (presumably, chest pain)(1), and it was not made clear whether or not this was to the exclusion of a pain-free presentation(2) characterised, instead, by, for example, sudden onset left ventricular failure or "collapse"(3). In the "worst case scenario" exclusion of ST segment elevation (STEMI) patient...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.