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Tissue-specific insulin resistance
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  • Published on:
    Re: Alas, Alas, Animal Models!

    Editor

    There is a very sad account of the fatal consequences of extrapolation of animal findings to humans, "recent experience with fialuridin ... five out of 15 patients died, two required emergency liver and kidney transplant for liver and kidney failure-this effect had not been demonstrated in four animal species."[1] This is a very sobering account of the consequences of extrapolating animal findings to humans....

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Alas, Alas, Animal Models!

    Dear Editor

    Jackson raises a point that is indeed relevant, and I fully agree that premature extrapolations to human therapeutics are dangerous.[1] If animals were all horses, wishes would fly! These animal studies only provide a glimpse into new possibilities and futuristic ideas. I am concerned about any other interpretation, and my opinion too is that, for the present, these findings cannot be translated into da...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Alas animal models
    Dear Editor

    Is it feasible to extrapolate animal findings to human medicine? We did not evolve (see http://www.kean.edu/~breid/chrom2.htm ). These chromosome numbers certainly do not support any evolutionary suppositions. Furthermore the mechanisms of meiosis serve to "fix" the chromosome numbers of sexually reproducing species. Is it not, therefore, dange...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.