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Postoperative hypoxaemia: telebrix aspiration
  1. Ina Dubin,
  2. Amichai Schattner
  1. Department of Medicine, Sanz Medical Center, Netanya and Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel
  1. Correspondence to Professor Amichai Schattner, Department of Medicine, Sanz Medical Center, Netanya and the Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, 91120 Israel; amischatt{at}gmail.com

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A healthy 62-year-old man presented with acute abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting due to a small bowel obstruction. An incarcerated inguinal hernia was found and he was operated on. In the recovery room, he became increasingly dyspnoeic (45 respirations/min) and hypoxaemic (oxygen saturation 84%), with neither pain nor fever. Chest X-ray (normal initially) and CT demonstrated diffuse bilateral alveolar infiltrates (figures 1 and 2). In the intensive care unit, he required incessant continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) …

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