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Endocrine problems in pregnancy
  1. Anjali Amin1,
  2. Stephen Robinson1,
  3. Tiong Ghee Teoh2
  1. 1Department of Metabolic Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Stephen Robinson, Department of Metabolic Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London W2 1NY, UK; stephen.robinson{at}imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

This paper aims to describe the pathophysiology and management of the main endocrine complications of pregnancy. For each endocrine dysfunction, the issues with the fetus, the mother, obstetric complications, and the long term prognosis for the disease itself need to be considered. Key management issues are highlighted with each condition. Thyroid dysfunction and goitre are common while management is relatively straightforward. Adrenal, pituitary, and parathyroid diseases present less commonly in pregnancy. Early recognition of endocrine disease in pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and fetus in the short and long term.

  • General endocrinology
  • Maternal medicine
  • Pregnancy
  • Thyroid disease

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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