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Acute blindness due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in a child
  1. Stavroula Ilia1,
  2. Maria Raissaki2,
  3. Elisavet Geromarkaki1,
  4. George Briassoulis1
  1. 1 Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece
  2. 2 Radiology Department, University Hospital, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece
  1. Correspondence to Dr Stavroula Ilia, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital, Medical School, University of Crete, Voutes PO Box 1352, Heraklion, Crete 71110, Greece; stayrinah{at}hotmail.com

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A 7.5-year-old previously healthy boy presented with progressively persisting headaches and acute blindness. Ophthalmologic examination disclosed visual acuity of 1/10, diminished colour vision and bilateral florid papilloedema. MR venography showed acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), (figure 1) and MRI showed signs of intracranial and optic nerve sheath hypertension without brain parenchymal anomalies (figure 2). Intracranial pressure (ICP) was measured at 23 mm Hg (normal value <15 mm Hg). Thrombophilic workup revealed homozygosity for the mutation C677T for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, a controversially discussed candidate genetic risk factor for hypercoagulability.1 The patient was put on …

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