Article Text

PDF
Evaluation of a workshop to improve residents’ patient-centred obesity counselling skills
  1. Amy M Burton1,
  2. Carl M Brezausek2,
  3. April A Agne3,
  4. Shirley L Hankins4,
  5. Lisa L Willett5,
  6. Andrea L Cherrington3
  1. 1Pediatric Endocrinology of North Texas, PLLC, Denton, Texas, USA
  2. 2Center for Educational Accountability, School of Education, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1665 University Boulevard, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
  3. 3Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
  4. 4Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1665 University Boulevard, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
  5. 5Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Andrea L Cherrington, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave. South, MT 612, Birmingham, AL 35205, USA; cherrington{at}uab.edu

Abstract

Background Primary care physicians are being asked to counsel their patients on obesity and weight management. Few physicians conduct weight loss counselling citing barriers, among them a lack of training and confidence. Our objective was to pilot test the effectiveness of a 3-h interactive obesity-counselling workshop for resident physicians based on motivational interviewing (MI) techniques.

Design This study used a pretest/post-test cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of resident physicians was invited to participate. Participating resident physicians completed a preintervention and postintervention questionnaire to assess their knowledge, beliefs and confidence in obesity counselling. MI techniques taught in the intervention were evaluated by audio recording interviews with a standardised patient (SP) pre intervention and post intervention. Audio recordings were transcribed and coded by two independent coders using a validated assessment tool. Paired t tests were used to assess preintervention and postintervention differences.

Results Eight-six residents attended the workshop. At baseline, the majority (71%) felt that there is not enough time to counsel patients about obesity and only 24% felt that residency trained them to counsel. After the intervention, knowledge and confidence in counselling increased (p<0.001). Among the 55 residents with complete pre-post SP interview data, MI adherent statements increased from a mean of 2.88 to 5.42 while the MI non-adherent statements decreased from 6.73 to 2.33 (p<0.001).

Conclusions After a brief workshop to train physicians to counsel on obesity-related behaviours, residents improved their counselling skills and felt more confident on counselling patients. Future studies are needed to assess whether these gains are sustained over time.

  • EDUCATION & TRAINING (see Medical Education & Training)
  • MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING
  • PAEDIATRICS
  • INTERNAL MEDICINE

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.