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Peer mentoring for core medical trainees: uptake and impact
  1. Jessica Webb1,
  2. Alexandra Brightwell2,
  3. Pamela Sarkar3,
  4. Roy Rabbie3,
  5. Indranil Chakravorty3
  1. 1Department of Cardiology, St George's Hospital, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Paediatrics, Norwich and Norfolk University Hospital, Norwich, UK
  3. 3Department of Acute Medicine, St George's Hospital, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jessica Webb, Department of Cardiology, St George's Hospital, London SW17 0QT, UK; jess{at}jesswebb.net

Abstract

Objective To assess the uptake and impact of a peer mentoring scheme for core medical trainees on both mentors and mentees.

Method All second year core medical trainees in the Southwest London Training programme in September 2012 were invited to mentor a first year core medical trainee. In parallel, all first year core medical trainees were invited to be mentored. Both potential mentors and mentees were asked to submit personal statements, to attend a three-session mentoring training programme and to be matched into mentoring pairs. The impact of the mentoring scheme on trainees’ behaviour and outlook was assessed through questionnaires distributed at the start and at the end of the year.

Results 31 of 72 (43%) core medical trainees submitted personal statements and 40 of 72 (56%) attended training sessions. 42 trainees (58%) participated in the scheme (21 mentor/mentee pairs were established). Of the trainees who participated, 23 of 42 (55%) completed the end of year questionnaire. Participating trainees viewed the scheme positively. Reported benefits included changes in their behaviour and acquiring transferable skills that might help them in later career roles, such as an educational supervisor. The end of year questionnaire was sent to all trainees and 10 responded who had not participated. They were asked why they had not participated and their reasons included lack of time, lack of inclination and a desire for more senior mentors. Their suggestions for improvement included more structured sessions to allow the mentor/mentee pairs to meet.

Conclusions This simple peer mentoring scheme was popular despite busy workloads and benefited all concerned. It is a simple effective way of supporting doctors. More work is needed to improve training for mentors and to improve access to mentoring.

  • MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING
  • QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
  • INTERNAL MEDICINE

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