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A simple and relatively painless technique for hysterosalpingography, using a thin catheter and closing the cervix with the vaginal speculum: a pilot study
  1. Ragaa Mansour1,
  2. Adel Nada2,
  3. Waleed El-Khayat2,
  4. Ahmed Abdel-Hak2,
  5. Hisham Inany1,2
  1. 1The Egyptian IVF-ET Center, Cairo, Egypt
  2. 2Department of Ob/Gyn, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  1. Correspondence to Ragaa Mansour, 3 B Rd 161 Hadayek El-Maadi, Cairo, 11431, Egypt; ragaa.mansour{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the use of a thin catheter for hysterosalpingography (HSG) for reducing the pain experienced during the procedure.

Methods Infertile women undergoing tubal patency tests were randomised into two groups. In the study group (n=66) a thin catheter originally designed for intrauterine insemination was used to inject the dye. Leakage of the dye was prevented using a vaginal speculum to press on the portiovaginalis of the cervix. The control group (n=23) underwent HSG using the standard metal cannula. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the level of pain immediately after the procedure. The main outcome measures were the level of pain experienced by the patient during the procedure and the efficacy of the new technique.

Results The mean (±SD) VAS was 11.2±3.1 in the study group and 54.7±10.1 in the metal cannula group (p<0.0001). During the dye injection, the VAS was 10.3±5.2 in the study group compared to 64.1±17.3 in the metal cannula group (p<0.0001). The new technique was successful in filling the uterine cavity with the dye and studying the fallopian tubes.

Conclusions Using a thin catheter for HSG and pressing on the cervix with the vaginal speculum to prevent leakage of the dye is a successful method to study the uterine cavity and fallopian tubes, and it significantly reduces the pain as compared to a metal cannula.

  • Hysterosalpingography
  • catheter
  • infertility
  • pain
  • tubal patency
  • gynaecology

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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