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Actual causes of death in Chaoyang District of Beijing, China, 2007
  1. Yu Wang1,
  2. Lan Zhang1,
  3. Jianshi Huang1,
  4. Wenjiang J Fu2,
  5. Xingming Li1,
  6. Haiying Meng3
  1. 1Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences; School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, PR China
  2. 2Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
  3. 3Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chaoyang District, Beijing, PR China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jianshi Huang, Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences; School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, No. 5 Dongdan Santiao, Beijing 100005, PR China; jessepumc{at}yahoo.com

Abstract

Objectives To identify and quantify major external (non-genetic) factors that contribute to death in Chaoyang District of Beijing, China in 2007.

Methods The death registration data reported to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention of Chaoyang District of Beijing, China, during the year 2007, were obtained. The analysis was conducted in 2009 using the health risk factors identified by the World Health Report 2002 and the population attributable fractions of mortality from Global burden of disease and risk factors. The estimates of actual causes of death attributable to each risk factor were calculated by multiplying the population attributable fractions of mortality by the corresponding number of deaths of the subgroup or total population.

Results The five leading actual causes of death in Chaoyang District of Beijing, China in 2007 were high blood pressure (2159 deaths, 18%), smoking (990, 8%), low fruit and vegetable consumption (968, 8%), high cholesterol (891, 7%), and physical inactivity (629, 5%). The pattern and ordering of these leading causes vary with sex and age specific subgroups.

Conclusions More than half of the total number of deaths in Chaoyang District in 2007 could be attributed to a few major preventable risk factors. Although the study focused on only one district of Beijing in one single year, and is by no means comprehensive, its findings suggest that public health policies and programmes in China should address these public health concerns by focusing on these largely preventable risk factors for primary prevention.

  • Causes of death
  • mortality
  • population attributable fractions
  • public health
  • health and safety

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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