Article Text

PDF
Abdominal compartment syndrome: an under-diagnosed contributory factor to morbidity and mortality in the critically ill
  1. J D Hunter
  1. Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Macclesfield, UK
  1. Dr J D Hunter, Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Victoria Road, Macclesfield SK10 3BL, UK; jdhunter{at}talk21.com

Abstract

As the abdomen is a closed cavity, it follows that any increase in abdominal contents will inexorably lead to a rise in the intra-abdominal pressure. Normally this is less than 7 mm Hg, but when it persistently exceeds 12 mm Hg, renal, intestinal, pulmonary, cardiovascular and central nervous system dysfunction arises. A wide range of conditions encountered in both medical and surgical intensive care units are associated with a rise in intra-abdominal pressure. When this pressure is continually above 20 mm Hg, organ system failure can occur, a condition known as abdominal compartment syndrome. Failure to recognise and treat this syndrome is associated with a high morbidity and mortality.

  • intra-abdominal hypertension
  • intra-abdominal pressure
  • abdominal compartment syndrome

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None.

  • Funding: None.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.