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Twenty four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: a new tool for determining cardiovascular prognosis
  1. K Madin,
  2. P Iqbal
  1. Chesterfield Hypertension Clinic, Chesterfield and North Derbyshire Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, Chesterfield, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr P Iqbal
 Chesterfield Hypertension Clinic, Chesterfield and North Derbyshire Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, Calow, Chesterfield S44 5BL, UK; Pervaiz.Iqbal{at}chesterfieldroyal.nhs.uk

Abstract

Twenty four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24-H ABPM) plays an important part in the management of subjects with suspected and confirmed disorders of blood pressure regulation. This article reviews the prognostic significance of various aspects of the 24-H ABPM and describes the authors experience in Chesterfield. Over the course of 12 month period from 1 August 2002, 1264 subjects had 24-ABPM. A total of 1187 (93.91%) subjects were included in this study, with mean age of 59.30 years and male:female ratio was 46%: 54 %. Fifty two (4.38%) of the subjects had all of the seven features associated with an adverse prognosis. Only 82 (6.90%) subjects had none of the seven adverse prognostic features with the remainder having one or more adverse prognostic features.

  • 24-H ABPM, 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • BP, blood pressure
  • SBP, systolic blood pressure
  • DBP, diastolic blood pressure
  • PP, pulse pressure
  • blood pressure
  • 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • adverse monitoring features
  • cardiovascular prognosis

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Footnotes

  • Funding: none.

  • Competing interests: none.

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