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A comparison of the clinical and cardiological features of endomyocardial disease in temperate and tropical regions.
  1. J. Davies,
  2. C. J. Spry,
  3. G. Vijayaraghavan,
  4. J. A. De Souza

    Abstract

    This study was designed to compare the clinical and cardiological features of endomyocardial disease in temperate and tropical regions. Eleven patients were studied in the U.K., 47 in India and 8 in Brazil. The patients in the U.K. were older, with a male predominance, and they had a systemic illness: the hypereosinophilic syndrome. Half of these patients presented in the early necrotic stage of the disease, and all had biventricular involvement. On the other hand, patients in the tropical countries were younger, with an equal sex incidence, and were from poor, malnourished communities with heavy parasite loads, especially filariasis in India. None presented in the early necrotic stage of the disease and a quarter had isolated right or left ventricular disease. In order to account for these differences between patients in temperate and tropical regions with endomyocardial disease, it was proposed that the nature of the underlying disease and the rate at which endomyocardial lesions develop, determine the clinical features of this disorder. In temperate climates eosinophil granule toxins may produce a rapidly progressive form of the disease in patients with the hypereosinophilic syndrome, whereas the disease may take longer to develop in patients in tropical climates, who have a less marked eosinophilia due to parasitic infections.

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